Remembering Walter Cronkite

The late CBS news anchor, Walter Cronkite, played a key role in the unravelling of Watergate.

Cronkite, who has died aged 92, broadcast two extensive stories on Watergate in 1972.

Ben Bradlee, the former Washington Post editor, said today that a lot of “Washington people, people who followed national stories – a lot of them who had not decided that we were right changed their minds because of Walter”.

This is part of Bradlee’s comments in Newsweek:

“In October 1972, Cronkite devoted two segments, back to back, to the Watergate story. The first was 14 minutes, the second eight.

I think that second night was curtailed by CBS chairman William S. Paley because Paley was scared of it.

The fact that Cronkite did Watergate at all (let alone at that length) gave the story a kind of blessing, which is exactly what we needed—and exactly what The Washington Post lacked.

It was a political year, and everyone was saying, “Well, it’s just politics, and here’s the Post trying to screw Nixon.”

We were the second-biggest newspaper in the country trying to scramble for a good story—whereas Cronkite was the reigning dean of television journalists. When he did the Watergate story, everyone said, “My God, Cronkite’s with them.”

Deep Throat Dies At 95; Most Famous Secret Source In US History

Mark FeltMark Felt, whose Deep Throat identity was revealed in 2005, has died, aged 95, at his home in Santa Rosa, California.

Felt was Associate Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) during the early period of Watergate. He started providing information and guidance to Washington Post journalist Bob Woodward in 1972.

Referred to initially as “my friend” by Woodward, Felt was nicknamed Deep Throat, a reference to a pornographic movie of the time. [Read more…]

Newspapers Report Death Of Gerald Ford

Former President Gerald Ford died on December 26, 2006.

Thirty-two years after he succeeded and then pardoned Richard Nixon, Ford was accorded considerable media coverage for his role in bringing the pain of Watergate to an end.

Los Angeles Times


W. Mark Felt Was Deep Throat

W. Mark Felt - Deep ThroatThe former deputy director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, W. Mark Felt, has been identified as Deep Throat by Vanity Fair magazine.

W. Mark Felt, 91, was second-in-command at the FBI in the early 1970s. His identity was revealed by Vanity Fair magazine, scooping the Washington Post.

The revelation was confirmed by Bob Woodward on the Washington Post’s website at 5.29pm Eastern time.

Felt’s family issued a statement which said: “The family believes my grandfather, Mark Felt Sr., is a great American hero who went well above and beyond the call of duty at much risk to himself to save his country from a horrible injustice. We all sincerely hope the country will see him this way as well.”

Felt suffered a stroke several years ago and lives with his daughter, Joan, in Santa Rosa. It appears he kept his Deep Throat identity a secret from his family until 2002. According to the family statement, Felt said: “I guess people used to think Deep Throat was a criminal, but now they think he was a hero.”

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Jason Robards, Star Of ‘All The President’s Men’, Dies, 78

Jason Robards with the ClintonsJason Robards, the actor who played Washington Post editor, Ben Bradlee, in the 1976 film about the Watergate scandal, All The President’s Men, has died, aged 78.

Robards won an Oscar for his performance in the film.

The actor died in Connecticut after a long battle with bowel cancer.

He was particularly noted for his performances in the plays of Eugene O’Neill.

He won consecutive Oscars as Best Supporting Actor in 1977 and 1978. His portrayal of Benjamin C. Bradlee is widely seen as an impressive performance of the “feisty” editor of the Post during the Watergate period.


Bob Woodward Says Deep Throat Is Still Alive

Speaking on the NBC “Today” program, Washington Post journalist Bob Woodward said that Deep Throat was still alive.

Woodward also said he was still in contact with Deep Throat and would only reveal the person’s name when he died.

Woodward said: “Twenty-five years ago he was risking a great deal personally and professionally. You may assume that in the course of this he was not truthful with colleagues and family members and he denied that he had provided information.”

Watergate 25 Years Later: Barry Sussman

Barry Sussman was an editor at the Washington Post during Watergate.

Myths and Collusion

by Barry Sussman

1. The Myth of Deep Throat

The most frequently-asked Watergate question is, “Who is Deep Throat?” I was the Washington Post’s editor in charge of the Watergate coverage and I still get asked that a lot, even though it is a quarter-century since the break-in at Democratic headquarters.

That’s the power of myth: Over the years an anonymous bit player, a minor contributor, has become a giant. [Read more…]